Pure iron causes stars to implode like our fucking sun you could destroy our universe with a cast iron skillet....what?!

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Mon, 04/02/2012 - 2:11pm


Comments

 
Sat, 04/16/2011 - 12:38pm
Alistor Says:

Hehehehe this highdea is the second listing.

 
 
Mon, 04/02/2012 - 11:21am
nurplette Says:

I didn't see it. I would've looked at the second page, but my googling always ends before I get there

 
 
Mon, 04/02/2012 - 2:16pm

Google read my mind, then that bitch turned on me and I still had to find the damn article

 
 
Fri, 04/15/2011 - 12:14am
ViDamin_D Says:

I saw this on the Universe on History Channel. I was blown away by it too. It destroys the sun's ability to fuse hydrogen i think...

 
 
Fri, 04/15/2011 - 12:33am
Its_Cookie Says:

Exactly the iron absorbs all the energy and wont fuse . By the way that whole series the universe blew my mind on a whole other level

 
 
Mon, 04/02/2012 - 11:08am
Per1phery Says:

the universe and cosmos are the two best television programs, ever, science-wise.

 
 
Sat, 04/16/2011 - 12:41pm
Alistor Says:

Here's an interesting article for ya concerning artifical "big bangs" created on a small scale using high speed lead particles at the Large Hadron Collider. A lot of questions were raised by these experiments.

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Sat, 04/30/2011 - 12:07pm
Its_Cookie Says:
 
 
Mon, 04/02/2012 - 8:26am

Cool beans . So now we no not to give the evil scientist iron skillets :)

 
 
Mon, 04/02/2012 - 9:51am
alabamaman Says:

But what if they make really good pancakes..

 
 
Mon, 04/02/2012 - 10:58am

You fool they can't make good pancakes, only evil ones

 
 
Mon, 04/02/2012 - 12:20pm

ok this happens to all stars with an iron core in the middle eventually the heat keeping the pressure inside is weaker then gravity pushing it down and as it is buring its hydrogen a layer colapses the energy bounces off the core then blast off the outer level our sun doesnt have an iron core for this to happen

 
 
Mon, 04/02/2012 - 12:23pm

this is the start of a planetary nebula(star death) its pretty common and necessary for our universe. and this if a black hole was going to be created this would be the start of that process eventually turning the white dwarf star into a neutrino star which is crazyness

 
 
Mon, 04/02/2012 - 3:52pm

its not the start of a planetary nebula, a planetary nebula is the result of a supernove, witch wouldnt happen unless our sun was a super-massive star, but its not. our sun is actually miniscule compared to some stars. iron would kill the star, it would swell up out to about the span of earth, and consume mercury and venus, and woul THEN implode causing a white dwarf. it would not destruct our universe at all, it would only effect 3 planets. and it wouldnt create a black hole. our sun is far too small.

 
 
Mon, 04/02/2012 - 3:57pm

and its not COMMON at all, its millions of years between star deaths, because all stars in our galaxy are in their main sequence.

 
 
Tue, 04/03/2012 - 1:18pm
Sleepy42 Says:

A star is comprised of hydrogen. non have an iron core. It creates the Iron when it runs outta hydrogen and starts fusing helium into other elements and those elements into other elements and so on and so forth until it creates iron. at that point the iron consumes too much of the stars energy. with no energy produced the gravity wins and the star collapses in on itself.

 
 
Tue, 04/03/2012 - 12:54pm
Sleepy42 Says:

Through the Wormhole. Watch that shit on the science channel while your stoned. You will never see the world the same way again. Mind blown, more like mind nuked.

 
 
Wed, 04/04/2012 - 7:25am
S00High Says:

Iron does not cause stars to explode.

The reason iron is mentioned is that, a dense star can fuse elements all the way up to iron.

Depending on how dense it is, it can go:

H --> He --> C --> Ne --> O --> Si --> Fe

It will not go past iron because iron has the highest nuclear binding energy of all elements. (actually, 2 isotopes of iron [Fe-58 & Fe-56] ; and one of nickel [Ni-62])

That means, these elements are the most stable elements possible in a fusion reaction.

It has to do with the arrangements of protons, neutrons, and electrons, and the strength of their electrostatic attractions due to their proximity and orientation to one another in and around the nucleus.

Smaller atoms are not held together as strongly, and larger atoms are too big and bulky and unstable to be as tight.

So, because all other atoms have a lesser binding energy than iron, no two iron atoms can fuse into anything higher without inputting more energy than is release. That means the process absorbs energy instead of releasing it, and it will only happen when there is a huge amount of energy such as a supernova. Only then do we get elements higher than iron.

But the supernova is not caused by iron. There are several types of supernova, but the type II may occur on a star with an iron core, and in that process, because there is not enough energy to fuse the inert core, the gravitational energy causes the matter to degenerate (a.k.a a core collapse), and as the center of the core implodes into a neutron star, there is a rebound effect which blows off the outer material.
uaafanblog
18th April 2008 - 06:30 AM
QUOTE (Latrosicarius+Apr 17 2008, 07:33 PM)
Iron does not cause stars to explode.

The reason iron is mentioned is that, a dense star can fuse elements all the way up to iron.

Depending on how dense it is, it can go:

H --> He --> C --> Ne --> O --> Si --> Fe

It will not go past iron because iron has the highest nuclear binding energy of all elements. (actually, 2 isotopes of iron [Fe-58 & Fe-56] ; and one of nickel [Ni-62])

That means, these elements are the most stable elements possible in a fusion reaction.

It has to do with the arrangements of protons, neutrons, and electrons, and the strength of their electrostatic attractions due to their proximity and orientation to one another in and around the nucleus.

Smaller atoms are not held together as strongly, and larger atoms are too big and bulky and unstable to be as tight.

So, because all other atoms have a lesser binding energy than iron, no two iron atoms can fuse into anything higher without inputting more energy than is release. That means the process absorbs energy instead of releasing it, and it will only happen when there is a huge amount of energy such as a supernova. Only then do we get elements higher than iron.

But the supernova is not caused by iron. There are several types of supernova, but the type II may occur on a star with an iron core, and in that process, because there is not enough energy to fuse the inert core, the gravitational energy causes the matter to degenerate (a.k.a a core collapse), and as the center of the core implodes into a neutron star, there is a rebound effect which blows off the outer material.

I think according to established theories of nucleosynthesis that ALL elements are a product of fusion.

Not that I'm a subscriber to that ... but it is the prevailing/accepted theory.

 
 
Sun, 04/08/2012 - 5:50am

it's actually when the star begins to produce iron at it's core lol you couldn't throw a piece of iron into the sun and expect it to supernova

 
 
Fri, 04/05/2013 - 11:37pm
splende Says:

The instant the sun starts to burn it will explode. boom